Students given back-to-school haircuts

Published 10:04 pm Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Ethan Richardson, 6, gets his hair cut Wednesday by barber Robert Sullivan with Teamwork Barber Shop at the Orrville Community Center.

Ethan Richardson, 6, gets his hair cut Wednesday by barber Robert Sullivan with Teamwork Barber Shop at the Orrville Community Center.

Five barbers from Selma’s Teamwork Barber Shop set up for business Wednesday in the Orrville Community Center.

They were there to give free haircuts to students to help them start the new school year in style.

“It means a lot,” said Orrville Mayor Louvenia Lumpkin. “When I saw them coming in with the chairs and equipment, [I just] got so excited.”

Nathaniel Johnson, owner of Teamwork Barber Shop, said providing back-to-school haircuts for children is nothing new for his shop.

In previous years, he has given haircuts at Keith and Selma High Schools. When Lumpkin reached out to him and his business, Johnson said he was more than happy to give back to the community.

“For so many years, they have been good,” Johnson said. “We came and try to be a blessing to kids on their back to school venture.”

Johnson said he has been cutting hair for over 20 years and his barbershop, located on J. L. Chestnut Jr. Boulevard, has been open for business the past 15-16 years.

Lumpkin said she wanted to provide this type of event to help families as they get ready for school. She believes the gesture will encourage children to give back to the community when they can.

“It teaches the children to give back. Once they become adults and do well in life, it teaches them to give back to the community,” Lumpkin said.

Doors opened at 9 a.m., but when Lumpkin arrived at the center an hour early, she said there was already a crowd of parents and their students waiting outside to take advantage of the opportunity.

Aveon Young, 10, said having the barbers come to Orrville is a convenience for many people living in the area.

“I think it’s better because we don’t have to ride out all the way to Selma,” he said.

The barbers worked like a choreographed dance by seating, trimming, clipping and sweeping without missing a beat.

A little over an hour into the event, Lumpkin said the barbers had already completed about 50 haircuts.

Johnson said the goal for the morning was to cut a minimum of 100 haircuts.