Venter honored as Volunteer of the Year

Published 10:39 pm Monday, May 9, 2016

Vaughan Regional Medical Center recently held its Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon to honor those who dedicate their time to the hospital. Pictured from left to right are Debra Schneider, David McCormack, Martha Plummer, Vaughan Volunteer of the Year Jannie Venter, Johnny Morris, and Kay Davidson.

Vaughan Regional Medical Center recently held its Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon to honor those who dedicate their time to the hospital. Pictured from left to right are Debra Schneider, David McCormack, Martha Plummer, Vaughan Volunteer of the Year Jannie Venter, Johnny Morris, and Kay Davidson.

After working several jobs through the years, Jannie Venter found a second calling after retiring in 2003.

She has devoted hours to Vaughan Regional Medical Center’s auxiliary, amassing more than 900 hours of service the past four years.

For that dedication, Venter was honored as the Volunteer of the Year during a recent luncheon to thank all hospital volunteers. The honoree is the person who receive the most votes from fellow auxiliary members.

“I was speechless. I didn’t have any idea. This shows that people watch you. I just do whatever it is that needs to be done,” Venter said.

Venter volunteers at the hospital every Tuesday, helping keeps things sanitized, directing visitors and completing other tasks to keep things running smoothly.

The hospital’s Director of Volunteer Service Kay Davidson said Venter’s positive attitude is contagious.

“Janie is very upbeat and positive. She is encouraging to patients and family members and always willing to do anything to help within the hospital and community as well,” Davidson said.

Davidson said it is important to have people like Venter as a volunteer at the hospital.

“She has such a positive attitude. I think she does an overall good job and is well-deserving of the honor,” Davidson said.

Venter said she was appreciative to have been chosen as volunteer of the year out of all of the other volunteers at the hospital.

“It’s just simple stuff, but I guess the simple things paid off. I’m just trying to make a difference and help the hospital because it needs all of the help it can get,” Venter said.