• 46°

Local Sorority chapter host walk around Selma Mall

Members of the Selma Alumae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Verlette Ferguson, left, and Carolyn Berry, right, take a lap around the inside of Selma Mall Saturday morning as a part of their sorority's Go Red Healthy Heart Walk. The walk included six laps around the Selma, which is the equivalent of one mile.

Members of the Selma Alumae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Verlette Ferguson, left, and Carolyn Berry, right, take a lap around the inside of Selma Mall Saturday morning as a part of their sorority’s Go Red Healthy Heart Walk. The walk included six laps around the Selma, which is the equivalent of one mile.

Not all Selma residents strolling in the Selma Mall Saturday were on a shopping trip. Some were walking to better their health.

The Selma Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority hosted a Go Red Health Heart Walk at Selma Mall Saturday to encourage residents to get active. Participants made six laps around the inside of the Selma Mall, which ended up being the equivalent of one mile.

“We are just not focused on things we need to be focused on,” Veronica Brown, the president of the Selma Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, said. “Our heart health is very important, so that’s why I think it’s important the community should come out and be informed.”

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., and exercising for at least 30 minutes each day can reduce the risk of getting heart disease.

“People do not get out and exercise,” Cynthia West, the Physical-Mental Health chairperson for the Selma Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, said. “[exercising] really helps our body.”

Players from R.B. Hudson Middle School’s baseball team, several members of the Selma Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta and others joined the Go Red Health Heart Walk Saturday.

West said it was important the chapter convince people of all ages to come out and participate, since heart issues are not limited to a certain age group.

“We want to attract young people as well as the middle-aged and the older people,” West said. “We’re were hoping for a good response today.”

Brown stressed the importance of being aware of what needs to be done to maintain a healthy heart.

The food you eat can decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke, according to the American Heart Association. The heart association’s website said eating foods low in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium and added sugars and sweetener and adding plenty of fruits, vegetables, fiber-rich whole grains, fish, nuts, legumes and seeds to a diet can help prevent heart disease.

“Knowledge is power,” Brown said. “Let’s all try to do better.”