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Barrier between street and river in works

Expect a new brick-and-iron barrier to go up at the end of Church Street where it intersects with Water Avenue.

A majority of Selma City Council members voted Tuesday to pool about $600 each from their oil and gas lease money to help with the $5,000 cost of building the impediment. Mayor George Evans said he would also contribute an equal amount for the project.

Prior to an accident authorities believe occurred around May 30, a wooden barrier painted yellow with red stripes marked the dead end that leads to a steep drop-off into the Alabama River between the Striplin building, which once housed the Safety Glass Co., and the Carneal building, now home to Arts Revive.

Micah Perry perished in that crash. His body was discovered by authorities shortly after family members reported him missing.

“I think this is something we need to do,” the mayor said Tuesday when he brought up the issue, which was not listed on the official agenda. “We have already had one family to lose someone.”

Council member Bennie Ruth Crenshaw elected not to participate in the project. “It’s not that I don’t want to take part,” she said. “My money is already designated.”

She later explained her money was marked to help close the city landfill in her Ward 7. The landfill is slated for closure by the fall. Additionally, Crenshaw said a junkyard in her ward would also require funds to help close and reclaim.

Oil and gas lease money is doled out equally to council members for bricks and mortar projects, such as upgrading sidewalks, in their various wards.