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Memory is a gift of God that death cannot destroy

When I was about 11 years old, living on Selma Avenue, I would ride my bike by the 400 block of Dallas Avenue where I first met Archie and the Reeves family, to include his grandmother, Mrs. Mallory. They had the largest kitchen I can remember, where we often ate snacks.

Archie would ride double with me, sitting on the handlebars. Mr. (big) Archie Reeves was a special kind of gentleman. He would ride us out to the Hugh Mallory house on Ninth Avenue. He would also go by his mother’s house on Lauderdale Street. She too was a sweet lady. We also got to see some hunting grounds where he hunted for quail and had dove shoots.

About four years ago Archie and Bill Hudson came out to my place for a quail hunt. We took pictures of the game with Archie, Bill and me standing back of the tailgate of my truck.

The last time I saw Archie was at Bill Hudson’s funeral service. Archie was at the door and he said to me, “Floyd, go on up to the front and sit with your family.” He knew that Bill and I were very close friends.

Archie, I know you and Bill are both looking down on us saying, “Let’s have one more good hunt together.”

Floyd Bowman Jr.

Selma