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Sting yields arrests

The Selma Times-Journal

Warrants never expire.

Local and federal officers banded together in an effort called FALCON 2008 to clear 35 outstanding felony warrants in Dallas County.

They met early morning on June 23 and prepared for the all-day hunt. Five citizens of Dallas County were arrested in the sting.

Authorities attributed the low number of arrests to people having moved or already serving time. The five people arrested were Carlos Dixon, Corey Steele, Jessica Postma, Calvin Walton and Nadeon Rudolph, all residents of Dallas County. U.S. Marshal Ross Herbert, when reached by telephone late Tuesday afternoon, couldn’t say what charges the warrants carried for each individual or where they lived.

The arrests, though few in number, drew applause from some law enforcement authorities.

The ones who have moved are safe for a little while longer. &8220;We are still going to follow up on the remaining warrants,&8221;

Herbert said. &8220;It is just a matter of time before extradition is cleared up and then we&8217;ll catch up with them. They shouldn&8217;t sleep well.&8221;

FALCON 2008 is a program that joins law enforcement on every level from city to federal.

The primary function is to go into areas and arrest people with outstanding warrants.

The sweep in Dallas County was part of a larger search for fugitives across the lower part of Alabama. Mobile, Baldwin, Clark and Dallas counties made up the largest number of warrants. The operation in Alabama lasted a week. During this time, it found a crystal meth lab in Mobile County, marijuana and an escapee from Alabama Department of Corrections. &8220;This was the first time we were involved in Dallas County,&8221; Herbert said. &8220;Next time, we hope to work even close and make more arrests.&8221; Herbert sends advice to the remaining fugitives in Alabama. &8220;Helping a fugitive puts a lot of burden and stress on the people helping them,&8221; Herbert said. &8220;We will exercise every right to find them anytime or anywhere. The best thing would be to turn themselves in. It would ease the pressure off of those helping them.&8221;