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Teachers learn at AMSTI

The Selma Times-Journal

Teachers around the state have learned how to make it rain.

They put potting soil and water in a plastic bag and placed it in a windowsill to demonstrate how water leaves and earth, turns to vapor and falls back to the earth as rain. This experiment and others taught math and science teachers this week how to improve their skills.

The Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative training held sessions last week for about 1,000 math and science teachers, trainers, and initiative staff from central Alabama, designed to improve math and science teaching statewide.

The classes began Monday and ended Friday. Participants spent from 8 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. learning the most effective way to reach students in the classroom.

Even a 30-year veteran like Hazel Peace of

Clark Elementary learned new techniques.

Gloria Childress called the initiative a plus for students because teachers can offer them options when it comes to learning.

Turkessa Garner, a parent of a high schooler, said if teachers had participated in programs such as the initiative when she attended school, they might have reached her in math and science classes.

Her daughter, T&8217;keyah Anderson, a 10th-grader at Selma High, makes A’s and B’s in math and science.

Anita Casby has taught first graders at Central Elementary in Lowndes County for eight years. She considers the initiative’s training a huge advantage for her students.