Dallas County should take advantage of right to vote

Published 5:05pm Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Every four years, voters turn out in relatively large numbers to choose a new president, but during the following election — midterms — numbers dip significantly.

A little more than 75 percent  —  about 30,000 — of Dallas County’s total population is registered to vote, which matches up fairly well with census data. According to the 2010 census, about one fourth of Dallas County’s residents are under 18.

Because nearly all eligible residents are registered, we hope that means well for the upcoming primary elections on June 3.

But if last elections’ turnout is any indication of 2014, it will likely mean less than two thirds of registered voters will fill out a ballot on June 3. In 2012, 21,022 people filled out a ballot. Typically mid-term elections have a lower voter turnout than presidential elections.

It’s nice to see that Dallas County has a higher voter turnout than the national average, which hovers in the high 50s and low 60s for presidential elections, but as the powder keg of the civil rights movement, Selma and Dallas County should reach 100 percent in every election.

Some of our state and national representatives frequently talk about ensuring the right to vote, but it seems that many are uninterested in voting. Either that, or the voters are unable to get to the polls.

Regardless, 2014 is an important year for our county. Positions aren’t the most appealing.

Tax assessor and tax collector don’t exactly make people want to rush to the polls, but sheriff, U.S. Congress and state senate should.

Some might say that state and national representatives just argue, never accomplishing anything significant because of political gridlock. Nevertheless, the represent our region in the state and U.S. capitol and the sheriff leads our county’s law enforcement agency.

On June 3, pick the person you feel is most qualified to shape the future of our region. Not only is it a right, but also a responsibility.

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