Oops on the first day

Published 4:59pm Monday, January 17, 2011

OK. The new governor is in his first day. He steps into the pulpit at Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, the late Martin Luther King Jr.’s church in Montgomery and he opens his mouth.

Gov. Robert Bentley begins to talk.

“I was elected as a Republican candidate. But once I became governor … I became the governor of all the people. I intend to live up to that. I am color blind.”

OK.  It’s kind of hard to see a GOP conservative as embracing “all the people.” I was fully convinced by his policies that George W. Bush, the former president, wanted all the unhealthy poor people to die, because they sucked so much from the federal pot his friends didn’t have enough. I’m digressing here.

Then Bentley, a deacon at First Baptist Church in Tuscaloosa, began talking about  the Holy Spirit and there might be some who were not Christians and saved. Those, Bentley said, are his brothers and sisters. He continued.

“Now I will have to say that, if we don’t have the same daddy, we’re not brothers and sisters. So anybody here today who has not accepted Jesus Christ as their savior, I’m tellin g you, you’re not my brother and you’re not my sister, and I want to be your brother.”

Wow! What an insult to everyone who is not Christian.

Then comes Rebekah Caldwell Mason, Bentley’s communications director, and says he’s governor of everyone…Christians and non-Christians.

Poor Mason for having to bring out the broom on the first day.

Now, I’m wondering about that word — tolerance — and our governor.

How about you?

  • D-Man

    SEAOAT

    Isn’t God a God “to all people Christians and also those not yet saved as well as non believers?”

    Yet, God believes in segregation – “Heaven and Hell”

  • SEAOAT

    Leesha, I don’t think they comprehend your message. Bentley should be governor to all people, Christians and
    also those not yet saved as well as non believers. We are all God’s children. His communication’s director
    had to save him by making a different statement altogether.

    • Nina

      SEAOAT,

      So You believe Gov Bentley should have left his religion outside the door of the Church?

      Nina

  • SEAOAT

    After reading Leesha’s article, I am in hopes that Gov. Bentley will prove to know more about about politics than he appears to know about religion. I have always taught we were all God’s children being brothers and sisters in the eyes of the Lord. He loves all the sinners. Thus, I am in hopes that the Governor will serve the needs of all people. You don’t mix religion in politics and expect success. I am afraid Alabama may be gone in the way of the nation. My opinion is that the state has taken the same road as our nation in electing an unqualified individual – a community organizer & a physician ????
    Leesha, appreciate your prospective.

    • Nina

      When he:

      ‘steps into the pulpit at Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, the late Martin Luther King Jr.’s church in Montgomery and he opens his mouth,’

      is he stepping in as the Governor or as a Christian?

      or

      is he stepping in as both?

      or

      should he be allowed to be both?

      Must he chose one or the other?

      Being a Christian is, by definition, a narrow way.

      Jesus himself said, “Unless You believe that I am (He) You will die in Your sins.” Pretty narrow minded if You ask me.

      I don’t think You’ll hear Gov. Bentley ‘preach’ in the big house… but in a Christian Church was this so inappropriate?

  • Renigade

    Leesha a great and truthful article. Let’s keep them all in the “Public Cross Hairs”. Dr. Bentley will prove to be the epidemy of weak leadership and that fact want take long to surface. Take a close look at his supporters here in Dallas County and you will get my “Drift”. This will make for great political cartoons in the paper —- I hope the STJ has a cartoonist! The “Circus” is just beginning —- enjoy the ride!!!

  • D-Man

    We’ll see how he does as governor.

    Every single person I’ve seen that won’t say what they think about difficult issues do more damage to this country than those who don’t.

  • LLN101

    I believe that Governor Bentley was making a good-hearted attempt at discipleship, and while many argue the complete separation of church and state I find that an individuals set of beliefs, especially their faith, should be and usually are a guiding factor of their decision making process. Dr. Bentley makes a statement of truth when he states “…if we don’t have the same daddy, we’re not brothers and sisters.” Just because your not a brother or sister (in Christ) of the Governor doesn’t mean he won’t take care of you equally. As his communications director said, he is governor of everyone, not brother and sister to everyone. In this current culture of rampant political correctness, I find it refreshing that a politician is willing to speak the truth and speak his mind, no matter who it offends. I respect offensive honesty much more than pleasant lies.

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