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Bridge Freedom Fest produced strong local participation

A bright sunshine and blue skies greeted the Bridge Freedom Fest on Saturday.

The Selma City School System and local businesses participated in the day-long event on parts of on Washington Street, Water Avenue, Selma Avenue Alabama Avenue and Franklin Street.

Beyond the Bridge Freedom Fest was hosted by TRHT Selma in partnership with the Selma Center for Nonviolence and Black Belt Community Foundation,  the City of Selma and Selma City Schools.

Collins Pettaway III and Lydia Chatmon were the co-hosts.

The event was scheduled for  Junteenth under the name Junteenth Freedom Fest, but it got  postponed because of weather.

“We were so excited to partner and be part of it,” SCS Superintendent Dr. Avis Williams said. “This is an opportunity for our community to come together in a positive way.”

Williams, Selma High Athletic Director Katasha Turner spoke

Selma AIR, LIFT Ministries, Rural Health, Inc. Vaughan Regional Medical Center and City of Selma were among the organizations that participated.

Selma native Krystal Gayle, who owns Ravishing Wicks in Montgomery, said she was glad to return home.

“Selma has showed me a lot f love,” Gayle said. I’ve done well here on my first two tries.”

LaTanglia Williams of LIFT Ministries said she was glad to participate in the event.

Rojos were among the food vendors at Freedom Fest.

Uneeq Scents and Accessories, owned by Gabriel Brown,  were among the vendors.

A health village was part of the festival, with free health screenings, healthy snacks, preventive care resources and COVID vaccines.

“This is an excellent opportunity to bring the community out to not only commemorate a momentous occasion, but to bring together people from all walks of life to simply have a great time,” Pettaway said.

The SCS also held its Back to School Bash between Broad Street and Alabama Avenue.

Selma High School, R.B. Hudson Middle School, Sophie P. Kingston, Edgewood Elementary and Meadowview Elementary all gave out school supplies.

Parents and students lined up to get crayons, notebook paper, pencils, pens and backpacks.