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Mud Run 5K supports charity

Elliot Oslund, left, and Will Sherrer race to complete the final obstacle during Saturday’s Mud Run 5K at Big Daddy’s Off Road.--Daniel Evans

Elliot Oslund, left, and Will Sherrer race to complete the final obstacle during Saturday’s Mud Run 5K at Big Daddy’s Off Road.–Daniel Evans

The Mud Run 5K Saturday at Big Daddy’s Off Road gave its participants a good reason to play in the mud.

Around 40 participants took part in the event, running over and through obstacles while getting soaking wet and covered in mud, all to help a local charity. All proceeds from the event went to Wannabe Rescued, a local non-profit organization that rescues dogs.

“We had a great turnout,” 5K organizer Jeffrey Nichols said. “They finished it a lot faster than I thought they would finish it. The support of it for Wannabe Rescued was great.”

Runners were forced to complete all kinds of challenges along the course, all while collecting wrist bands that showed they had completed challenges.

The final stretch, a muddy jog through a sloppy lake, was just part of the fun.

“They had wall climbs, burpees, cinder blocks, jumping over fire and jumping into ice water,” Nichols said. “They moved obstacles from one spot to another spot. It was a whole bunch of stuff. It turned out really good and they rocked it.”

Nobody ran the course faster than Callie Gunzenhauser, who finished in 34:22 and won $50.

However, it was pretty clear Saturday’s big winner was Wannabe Rescued, who will be able to help a lot more animals thanks to those that participated in the run.

“We couldn’t be more excited,” Bonnie Hobbs, with Wannabe Rescued, said. “Any time we can get the public to know more about Wannabe Rescued and to help the sheltered animals we pull out of the Selma Animal Shelter and the ones we find in ditches and off the side of the road, [it’s great]. Any time other people will help us raise money to help pay for vet costs, we are thrilled.”

Hobbs said vet costs ends up being one of the biggest hurdles they have to overcome.

“The cost just gets higher and higher as we try to help as many puppies and dogs as we can,” Hobbs said. “It just seems like the vet bills just keep piling up and piling up, so when more people get involved that is one more vet bill we can pay and one more dog we can help.”