Southside Primary hosted a Black History program Friday to recognize prominent African-Americans who contributed to American history. (Sarah Robinson | Times-Journal)
Southside Primary hosted a Black History program Friday to recognize prominent African-Americans who contributed to American history. (Sarah Robinson | Times-Journal)

Southside students celebrate Black History

Published 8:46pm Monday, March 3, 2014

Smiles, laughter and cheers filled Southside Primary’s cafeteria Friday afternoon as students, teachers, staff and parents watched Southside students present pivotal moments and leaders in African-American history.

Southside Primary hosted a Black History program Friday to recognize prominent African-Americans who contributed to American history. Students shared Black history through impersonation, reenactments and song.

“They can’t forget,” Southside Primary School Principal Brenda Mitchell said. “I think a lot of times that’s what wrong with our young kids. They are forgetting where they come from, and they don’t understand where they are coming from. ”

Prepared over the course of three weeks, the program honored professional tennis players Venus and Serena Williams, gymnast and Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas and First Lady Michelle Obama, U.S. President Barack Obama and many more.

Mitchell said learning about past generations can help current and future generations grow into successful citizens.

“They need to know they have something they need to be proud of, and they can go places,” Mitchell said. “It’s important we instill that in them while they are young, so they can strive to achieve these different things that all their ancestors have achieved.”

Woodrow Richardson, a parent of one of the kindergarten students who participated in the program, said he also believes recognition of African-American history will result in a positive, victorious group of adults.

“I think it was an excellent experience for all of them,” Richardson said.

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