Pastor John Grayson, of Selma’s Gospel Tabernacle Church, said he often uses his iPad to refer back to messages he has given over recent years. -- Jay Sowers
Pastor John Grayson, of Selma’s Gospel Tabernacle Church, said he often uses his iPad to refer back to messages he has given over recent years. -- Jay Sowers

Pastors, church members increasingly use new technology

Published 9:28pm Saturday, February 22, 2014

God’s rays of light might not be the only source of light shining from the pulpit as more church leaders incorporate technology into their church services.

Preachers in the Dallas County community are turning to a more digital method of spreading the Word of God as technology advances. Local pastors explain the convenience of using an electronic device to prepare and deliver their sermons.

“I use mine probably more than most people do,” Pastor John Grayson of Gospel Tabernacle Church said in reference to the iPad and iPhone he uses for church.

When Grayson of Gospel Tabernacle Church first started preaching 40 years ago, he could not even imagine preaching from a digital device. Decades later, he is heavily dependent on them to share God’s message.

Grayson said he has a Bible app on both his iPad and iPhone to prepare and deliver his sermons.

Grayson said both devices make it easier and quicker for him to get the information he needs.

He also likes the fact the devices are lighter than the Bible.

“The good thing about having an iPhone and iPad is you have the iCloud,” Grayson said. “You can duplicate your information on one device, and it automatically goes on the other device.”

Pastor Leroy Strong of Brown Chapel AME church said he uses electronic devices to prepare sermons all the time, but rarely delivers a speech with electronic devices.

“It’s convenient, but it’s more than that,” Strong said. “It gives you access to all kinds of resources online. “

Grayson recalled the days when families would hand Bibles down to the younger generation.

“Back then, you cherished it. It was the most precious thing you ever had,” Grayson said. “You signed it, put your name in it, the date you received it and all that.”

Grayson said those days are quickly fading.

“Now the actual physical Bible is almost obsolete,” Grayson said. “Most people use their electronic devices, such as their iPhone and iPad to read the Bible now.”

Grayson said he enjoys the convenience of a digital Bible, but nothing compares to the comfort of having a hard copy of the Bible in hand.

“There is absolutely nothing that can replace actually having the Bible,” Grayson said. “It gives you some sense of protection, or maybe a little closeness with the actual content of the scriptures in the hard copy. It’s just more precious having a Bible with you.”

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