Salvation Army cuts ribbon on Thrift Store

Published 7:46pm Saturday, May 18, 2013

 

City leaders came out Thursday for the ribbon cutting of the new Salvation Army Thrift Store.  Picture center, is Maj. Steve Welch with the Salvation Army. -- Sarah Cook
City leaders came out Thursday for the ribbon cutting of the new Salvation Army Thrift Store. Picture center, is Maj. Steve Welch with the Salvation Army. — Sarah Cook

As a way to recognize and celebrate the 60th Annual National Salvation Army Week, local leaders met at the Salvation Army Family Store, located on Broad Street, and cut a large red ribbon outside the store — signaling the store’s official grand opening. 

“Every year, it’s important for The Salvation Army to say ‘thank you’ to the people who make it possible for us to help others who are looking for hope during difficult times,” said Maj. Steve Welch, Corps Officer for the Selma Command serving the Black Belt.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower declared the first National Salvation Army Week between Nov. 18 and Dec. 4, 1954 as a reminder to Americans that they should give freely of themselves.

Since the Salvation Army began its social service work in the United States in 1880, Selma in 1903, Welch said the organization has grown into one of the largest social service providers in the country.

“We strive to meet the needs that aren’t being met and some of the ways we do that is through the food pantry and the store,” Welch said. “Since we’ve opened we’ve had several fires in the community, so we’ve been able to help people replace some of their losses.”

More than 7,000 people from Dallas, Choctaw, Lowndes, Marengo, Perry and Wilcox counties were assisted by the Selma Salvation Army last year.

“Doing the most good with what we have, that’s what we try to do,” Welch said. “All the money raised goes back into our operating budget to help others who have needs.”

And although the dates have changed since the first National Salvation Army Week, Welch said the work of the Salvation Army has not faltered.

“We try to provide hope to those who need it,” he said. “Plain and simple.”

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