U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) talks to guests who attended his town hall meeting last year at the St. James Hotel in Selma. Shelby has scheduled his annual visit to Selma for Monday, Feb. 18, again at the St. James Hotel.

Shelby plans visit, lunch in Selma

Published 10:07pm Thursday, February 7, 2013

Dallas County residents who are hungry for information on issues facing the state, may soon find their fill in Selma.

U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby will be joining residents of Dallas County for lunch, Monday, Feb. 18 and address the legislative agenda for the first sessions of the 113th Congress as well as issues facing the nation and the state.

The meeting is open to the public and will take place at the St. James Hotel at noon, Feb. 18.

“It’s like a town hall type meeting,” Selma-Dallas County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Sheryl Smedley explained. “It’s lunch with the senator. He’s actually coming from Marion. He’ll be in Marion in the morning and then he’s coming to Selma to eat lunch.”

“Over the years, these meetings have provided an excellent opportunity for area residents to listen and voice their opinions on the activities of our government,” Shelby said in a statement Wednesday. “This will be a great chance to discuss the important issues facing our state and our nation.”

Following the address, Sen. Shelby will open the floor to questions and comments from those in attendance.

“It’s an opportunity to come out and meet Sen. Shelby, and if you have any questions that you’d like him to answer now’s the time,” Smedley said. “He’s giving his time to speak to residents in the area. This is an opportunity for him to reach out to those citizens and it just gives citizens an opportunity to tell him what’s on their mind.”

Sen. Shelby’s stop in Selma will be his 1,764th county visit sine his election to the U.S. Senate.

Tickets for lunch are $15. For tickets call Smedley at 875-7241.

There will be additional seating for those who do not wish to purchase a ticket for lunch.

  • acourtland

    Considering that he is one of the vehicles in the gridlock in Washington DC, it would bring me great pleasure to hear him announce his retirement at this luncheon, like the other relic from Georgia, Saxby Chambliss. Wishful thinking, though.

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